Johnny Marr

Johnny Marr

Every year we resist the temptation to copy and paste an artist's biography onto this page, choosing instead to painstakingly handcraft every word, pretend to be proper music journos and use fancy describing words like 'delicious'. But the opening line of Johnny's biog states - 'one of the most celebrated guitarists in the history of contemporary music' and you can't argue with that can you? As you might expect from someone of his standing he puts in a cracking live performance showcasing material from his acclaimed 2013 debut album 'The Messenger' mixed up with, how can we put it, older tunes. We are expecting you to all be in fine voice, and it's hard to know what else to say except (in the words of that infamous t-shirt) - it's Johnny F*****g Marr.

British Sea Power

British Sea Power

In common with Stornoway (headlining on Sunday) a love of nature is evident in the work of BSP, especially the sea and the history of our relationship with it. Indeed at time of writing they have just released their second soundtrack album 'From The Sea To The Land Beyond' to critical acclaim (The Sunday Times, Album Of The Week). They are unconventional, Mercury Prize nominated with a longevity that suggests they are a band whose best work could easily be to come. 'Loving Animals' from the last album 'Machineries Of Joy' is a personal favourite track, going big on juxtaposition and highlights the sheer variety of mood, volume and sentiment that they are capable of. Perhaps this explains their reputation as a live band, and the reason their fanatical fans return to their shows time after time.

Stornoway

Stornoway

We've watched Stornoway many times over the years in various places from big festivals to small acoustic gigs. And as soon as singer Brian Briggs opens his mouth to sing you feel that warmth that typifies their material. It transports you, so it does. Warmth and the romance of everyday scenarios like the sun on your back in 'Farewell Appalachia' or those first days away from home at college in 'Zorbing' ("Conkers shining on the ground, the air is cooler and I feel like I just started Uni"). Takes me back anyway. Additionally, the ladies in the office find their drummer to be devastatingly handsome, in a Cillian Murphy sort of way no doubt. Stornoway - the perfect Sunday afternoon headline on the main stage.

Steve Mason

Steve Mason

When The Beta Band appeared in the late 1990s I remember being struck by how unlike anyone else they sounded (as well as how great they were). Fast forward to 2013 and The Beta Band frontman and driving force Steve Mason releases his second solo record 'Monkey Mind In The Devil's Time' to seemingly universal acclaim. A fantastic record, it rewards frequent listening with its wide range of styles and depth... reminds us that these days we (meaning DSF, with music overflowing the inbox) don't give records time like we used to. As well as writing about the more troubling aspects of his own life Steve Mason is a man with very many political concerns which are heavily reflected in his lyrics. On top of all this he is an amazingly engaging live performer.

Dan Le Sac vs Scroobius Pip

Dan Le Sac vs Scroobius Pip

We haven't in the past laid on much music which might be described as 'urban'. Very few hip hop crews make the pilgrimage to the lush pastures of Baldersby Park. None in fact. Not that 'urban' or 'hip hop' would accurately describe Dan Le Sac vs Scroobius Pip anyway. Scroobius Pip is a man with a lot of worthwhile things to say about modern life - a performance poet rather than an MC and, the last time we saw him live (minus Monsieur Le Sac), a fantastically entertaining and thought-provoking night out. Dan Le Sac ups the pace with Super Mario beats as on debut single Thou Shalt Always Kill, a good tune to start with for the uninitiated. Due to the national variations in household swearing policy we'd better warn you that His Scroobiusness uses the occasional cussword by way of extra emphasis.

Toy

Toy

Every year there is always one band booking we make where we feel we've put the cherry on the cake and in this regard this year's band was Toy. Like OMG. Friday night on the main stage should blow your head off or at least warp it a little. So Toy, despite many tags (Krautrock surely being the most apt, having just got a proper definition off Wikipedia) are in essence a great pop outfit. OK, strung out pop maybe with occasional day trips out to the progressive wilds. Conductor, first track off last year's second album is such a trip reaching Ozric Tenticles territory in places, but their eponymous debut album is where the 'pop' stuff lies in abundance. Always remembered as the live session on 6music that blew Mark Radcliffe's stick out of the mud, at least for an afternoon.

Slow Club

Slow Club

Slow Club are Sheffield boy-girl duo Charles Watson and Rebecca Taylor. The band formed in 2005 when they were both still teenagers and spent the next two years touring relentlessly around the North of England. They have released two albums to date with their third eagerly awaited early in 2014. It is interesting to listen back to the first two albums as they so reflect what it's like to be a young thing and note how their sound changes as they get older. Also worthy of some pondering is what it must be like writing songs with someone of the opposite sex? I would suggest that the songs have an emotional openness and maturity as is certainly the case with other boy girl combo Big Deal. Like I say just pondering. Whatever the case Slow Club, with a full band behind them, will deliver a charged yet thoughtful show and give you the perfect excuse to reflect upon your own ups and downs.

Summer Camp

Summer Camp

Summer Camp, for those that don't know, are husband and wife team Jeremy Warmsley and Elizabeth Sankey. They write hook-laden indie-pop steeped in nostalgia. Nostalgia for 1980s American culture especially. This is gloriously played out in their live show. Looking much like a married couple at their friend's wedding, Summer Camp take to the stage to do a turn. They then slowly draw you into their 1980s fantasy world with the help of stage projections of every dance scene from every U.S. teen flick of that era. Flashdance, The Breakfast Club, Grease through to the inevitable Napoleon Dynamite routine and more besides (we're no experts). A strangely intoxicating mix that will have you rapt.

Cate Le Bon

Cate Le Bon

No relation, Cate credits her stage name to a 'joke that went too far'. Brilliant. Cate is fantastic, to our ears her music is delightfully unsettling, partly down to her unique vocal style but her voice is also rolled up in arrangements which slightly freak out in places (the lone horn note in the chorus of I Can't Help You.) The whole combination is most certainly very different, which is what we like. Recently swapping Wales for LA no less, her third album Mug Museum was recorded out there and that's the point at which we jumped onboard. Porcelain related coincidences here as she does invoke the spirit of Gong's album The Flying Teapot. As part of the Welsh scene she has appeared on Neon Neon tunes with Gruff Rhys and Stephen Black AKA Sweet Baboo has played bass on her tunes (or Sweet Bamboo as we typo-ed, like a hungry panda in last year's programme.)

Wolf Alice

Wolf Alice

Every year we have a weekend away at an 'industry festival' - The Great Escape in Brighton or this year we're giving Liverpool Sound City a go. Up the North and all that. The aim of these outings is to see as many new bands as possible, typically twenty or so over a couple of days. There's lots of standing up, queuing, sore feet, coffee, beer, ice-cream, coffee, ice-cream ... but everything we do, we do it for you. It is clear to us that the world is on the constant lookout for a striking girl, an electric guitar wizard to replace the house-bound Polly Harvey. So in Brighton last year we overcame our fear of very tight venues, clearly over their fire safety numbers and caught three tracks from Wolf Alice who lived up to all the hype surrounding them and front lady Ellie Rowsell certainly has huge PJ potential. Very, very exciting to have them.

We Were Evergreen

We Were Evergreen

They are back. Having bands return is not something we do lightly, after all there's a big wide world of music out there to plunder. There are of course exceptions for exceptional bands. In 2012 they so caught the mood of a beautiful Sunday morning on the main stage, although as is typical we missed them completely. But we did catch them twice that year at Wilderness festival where it was clear they could catch the mood of a hedonistic Saturday night as well as a Sunday morning. That year our friends from Leeds, Anthologies, did a recording session in our woods which you must check out. French of course and perhaps because of this they've a very light touch, their music floats and bounces like Fabienne Débarre's mallet rebounding off her xylophone. They are joyously infectious live and not to be missed.

Withered Hand

Withered Hand

Always a band that our spies in Edinburgh said we should go for. Not until we saw them live did it push our view of them from a good band on record into a great band live. Like Veruca Salt we just had to have them. Withered Hand is a fairly unsettling name for a band, but after watching them it seemed to fit. Singer and main man Dan Willson has an irresistible self-deprecating inter-song banter - a nervous English man in Scotland who in our mind's eye we see walking into an Edinburgh dockers pub that suddenly turns threateningly silent. Lots of the new album got played at The Kids Are Solid Gold gig at the Westgarth in 'Boro, heard by us for the first time and instantly super. 'Black Tambourine' here is off the new record and is a knock out don't you think?

Catfish And The Bottlemen

Catfish And The Bottlemen

Currently held up high above the Radio 1 airwaves Catfish And The Bottlemen are a four piece rock band based in Llandudno. You can refer to them as either just 'Catfish' or just 'The Bottlemen' or both probably dependent upon how old you are - and they are a band who have a more pronounced demographic of fan than we're used to (young folks) and no bad thing. They present themselves in press shots and on record in a way that one might describe as stadium-ready. Building much momentum after playing last year's Reading and Leeds festival, their new single is branded with the prestigious Zane Lowe 'hottest record in the world' accolade. Not to be taken lightly. Our kids love 'em to the extent that our most familiar rendition of Homesick is an out of tune version sung by a child wearing headphones in the back of the car.

Miles Hunt & Erica Nockalls

Miles Hunt & Erica Nockalls

If you were to flick back through the history of Deer Shed Festival you would eventually get to year one, stating the bleeding obvious, and you'd find Miles and Erica headlining a tent just after the beer had run dry. Perhaps you were there. They are back to entertain you again with a raft of solo and stuffies material. What can we say about The Wonder Stuff frontman that hasn't already been said? Miles and Erica put on an über-entertaining show with much banter and chat. Incidentally Miles is also about to publish the first edition of his diaries this year. In a separate performance he'll be reading exerts, answering questions and generally dishing the dirt we suspect. His lesser known solo album Hairy On The Inside has some real gems including our fave Amongst The Old Reliables.

Denai Moore

Denai Moore

There was a time when we had loads of music on mainstream telly, now we have Later and that's about it. For most artists it is therefore really, really hard to get exposure. The fact that Denai Moore got to hang out with Jools on TV at the tender age of 19 speaks so much for her talent. The now 20 year old, born in Jamaica and raised in London, has an amazing haunting voice and is at home on either guitar or piano it seems. Her appearance on the scene has attracted much attention including that of Ben Drew (AKA Plan B) who co-produced much of her debut EP 'The Lake'. We are getting strong hints of Bon Iver in her music especially in the middle sections of her track 'Wolves' featured on Spotify here. Sure to be a lovely show Lodge stage Friday.

PAWS

PAWS

PAWS are a frantic Nirvana format three-piece from Scotland, although there is no sense of that in their music. Seattle would be where the needle on the style-o-matic meter would point to. Singer Phillip Taylor comments in a recent interview that "we are playing in this band to keep going and stay alive" and of course for some people bandage can be a focus, a saviour and an outlet - as opposed to a career ladder. Indeed lyrically their recent debut album 'Cokefloat!' (yum) reflects life's trials including the tragic death of Taylor's Mum. Interestingly on their (all over 6 music) single 'Sore Tummy' Taylor shares vocal duties with Big Deal's (easy on the eye) singer Alice Costelloe. PAWS have also been known to do a smashing cover of Big Deal's big tune 'Chair' - a song that excruciatingly lays teenage longing bare, especially if you know the history of how Big Deal got started. Investigate!

Samantha Crain

Samantha Crain

Samantha is a 26 year old singer songwriter from Oklahoma, where the wind comes sweeping down the plain. We'll level with you, we are not experts on county music, we couldn't tell you where she sits in the rich tapestry of Americana. We'll get our coat. She is probably nu-country or something, a genre we'll make up and populate with other artists we love that are country-ish but not Islands In The Stream - say Josh Rouse and Willard Grant Conspiracy. This much we know - Samantha's voice is quite mesmerising, listening to For The Miner on headphones she certainly invokes that weird longing that we Brits feel for the States, where you have space to ride a horse properly and time don't move so fast i.e. somewhere that probably only exists in films. Effortless and lazy even but no doubt the sentiment behind that particular track is pretty deep. We are looking forward to her performance very much.

Pins

Pins

"I feel alright, I feel so young, there's nothing else a want to become ... I'm Lost I'm Lost I'm Lost" sings Pins singer Faith Holgate in her characteristic drawl. Not sure I'd want to be young in 2014, the slow decline aside. So you're young trying to define yourself in a digital age: easier or harder than it used to be? It would certainly involve much more typing. Pins are a Mancunian all female four-piece signed to Bella Union with fairly obvious influences (Siouxsie And The Banshees, The Slits, the sound of rebellion from yesteryear in general we suppose. What is the sound of rebellion in 2014?) Anyways, a great live band, and off on tour with Warpaint we note. If you have a sulky teenage daughter with a bad attitude send her down to the front for this one to let off steam.

All We Are

All We Are

We are very excited to have All We Are playing this year. A band who make a sound like no other, which makes a change from guitar bands singing those irritatingly omnipresent Ooo Ooos. That might just irritate us. Weirdly they are graduates of Macca's Liverpool Institute Of Performing Arts. We say "weirdly" because Stealing Sheep (from DSF4) passed through its halls and there are similarities which I'm putting down to students from all over the place coming together and mixing styles and backgrounds. Indeed All We Are fly in from Norway, Brazil and Ireland. All this is very encouraging, my previous view of the LIPA was always the opening titles from Fame, harping on about paying in sweat and dancing on canteen tables. The band described their flangey-basstastic single 'Utmost Good' as the Bee Gees on diazepam. Additionally no computers are used in recreating their sound live. It should be a fantastic show.

Cheatahs

Cheatahs

Musical genres are weird aren't they. You can be a country band and sound much like any other country band and nobody cares. But if you sound like a certain seminal early 1990s shoegazer band things get somewhat trickier. Everybody loves My Bloody Valentine, especially Loveless, one for Deer Shed Festival 8 :) Any artist who makes specific guitar stompboxes their own seems to forever claim that sound as their own (Jimi Hendrix's wah-wah or My Bloody Valentine's pitchshifters) but the effect of Cheatahs is irresistible, however derivative the sound might be. The Swan featured here is SO Bob Mould (Hüsker Dü in the 1980s and Sugar in the 1990s) we had do an internet search to be certain it was their song, which it is. I guess the upshot of all this is that it doesn't matter a jot who you sound like if you sound as good as Cheatahs do.

Georgia Ruth

Georgia Ruth

Raised bilingually in Aberystwyth, West Wales Georgia Ruth is a Welsh singer, songwriter and most unusually a harpist. Her haunting voice has drawn favourable comparisons with the melancholy folk sirens of the late-60s. Her harp playing was inspired more by the finger-picking style of guitarists such as Bert Jansch and Meic Stevens than by the classical method she was taught as a child. Georgia regularly plays in ex-Gorky Richard James' band. In 2013 Georgia's debut album 'Week Of Pines' won her the Welsh Music Prize last year against pretty stiff competition (regarded within the industry as the Welsh Mercurys.) Her music is gentle and delicate, underpinned by the ebb and flow of the harp. Beautiful. "One of the British folk discoveries of the year" says The Guardian.

Girls Names

Girls Names

With every passing year, as we move further away from the 1980s, that decade's music seems to grow in it's appeal. Musical variety was the thing that made the 1980s great with a big contribution coming from the birth of indie. Upon hearing Girls Names for the first time ten seconds into the track my view was that we should get them booked prompto. So refreshing was their sound to our 2014 jaded ear trumpets. Girls Names is a four-piece band from Belfast formed in 2009. Different tracks on last year's debut album 'The New Life' remind us of various 80s icons. Sometimes it's The Smiths without Morrissey, a synthless Depeche Mode, The Church (remember them?) and of course The Cure. It's all pretty dark sounding but The New Life is a great album and is the antidote to a great many things in the decade following the naughties (whatever we decide to call it.)

Teleman

Teleman

Teleman are currently evoking visions of the weirder editions of 1970s Top Of The Pops, like those inhabited by bands like Sparks although Teleman don't look quite that odd to be fair. They have a fairly timeless sound which initially you put down solely to singer Thomas Saunders' voice but the simple arrangements play their part here too. Whilst these London boys are a pretty new proposition Thomas's voice is utterly unmistakable as that of the now defunct Pete And The Pirates who split last October. Of course bands should split up more often for what emerges is often fresher than what went before, a sentiment shared by John Peel I seem to recall. With supports slots for Suede and Bernard Butler producing their debut album they've certainly enjoyed Suede related patronage of late.

Girls Names

John Smith

Like We Were Evergreen, John Smith is another artist whose press shots have him waist deep in water. Smith admits to a fascination with 'notions of water' with last year's album fittingly named 'Great Lakes'. A guitarist and songwriter John Smith inhabits a familiar genre, one we'll call post-Bon Ivor Nick Drake, P-BIND of short. It is music that you must give time too, surrender yourself too, lyrically reflect upon. Not squandered against a background of driving screaming kids to swimming lessons for example. Perhaps the Lodge Stage on Sunday morning, on a sofa, with the kids wrapped up in the cinema tent and a Latte in hand, paper, letting your mind wander enjoying the top quality troubadour that is John Smith.

Post War Glamour Girls

Post War Glamour Girls

Listening to Post War Glamour Girls you are not sure what is coming next and these jaded ears at least are surprised by the twists and turns of the accompaniment, mood and texture. In Sestra, the opening track of this year's album Pink Fur, has vocals that swerve violently, sometimes reminiscent of Alex Turner and at other times the singer from fellow Leeds band I Like Trains. It's taking a little while to pin all this juxtapositioning down but it's most refreshing, and all within just one song. The next off the album goes all Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds. Admittedly blowing our own trumpet it seems we have every possible flavour of indie this year with quality oozing out lower down the bill as well as at the top. First on our In The Dock stage these guys are the perfect start to a great day of music. Sure to be suitably intense.

Raglans

Raglans

Raglans are a young Irish four-piece band from in and around Dublin who, despite their looks, have decided to park the van a considerable way up the road from the boy zone. Their popularity is probably built-in - their music is sing-a-long, anthemic, jaunty, made for festivals ... all that stuff. Mixing up a bit of Libertines, Jake Bug and a slight whiff of Two Door Cinema Club the band are very well regarded in their home city with their reach seemingly growing all the time, not surprising given all the ingredients. Our office Christmas party was an overnight stay in Dublin to watch our hero Damien Dempsey play at the Vicar Street venue and it seems to us that just to be massive in Dublin is something that many bands would settle for, we would. Dublin in the run up to Christmas is off-the-scale fun especially if your kids are on the other side of the water. So Raglans, the perfect start to Saturday's music line-up on the main stage.

Bleech

Bleech

Bleech, another of this year's bands famed for explosive live shows. Good-oh. As importantly what we have here is the perfect storm of pop and indie and punk. It's really worth checking out the whole of 2012 album Nude, it's got some crackers. It's not very often that we pick particular lyrics out of a song but the track Weirdo with 'to be loved by you is such a waste of time' refrain gives this particular dad such a feeling of general downtroddeness I feel pulled back to folding the washing. Obvious vitriolic comparisons with Elastica then but they're better than Elastica. Sisters Katherine and Jen O'Neill do that lovely sibling harmonising thing whilst drummer Matt absolutely nails it. Not to be confused with Bleached, another great girl band. Opening the festival on the Main Stage on Friday so do be sure you set off from home early.

Lyla Foy

Lyla Foy

This year we've quite a lot of music that is going to grab you and give you a good shaking so it's a good thing to slow things down, especially on Sunday, and present an artist who might give one a pause for reflection amidst the carnage of the Badge Making workshop. Lyla Foy is a 25 year old singer, songwriter and notably producer who was formerly known as WALL, which wasn't a great fit for her style of music to be honest especially as Lyla Foy is actually a great stage name. Anyhows, 'whimsical minimalism' is the term that we've settled upon to describe her music and I think it probably takes some discipline to pull it off the way that she does. An understated accompaniment generated from a menu of familiar electronic beats and beeps with Lyla's dreamy and creamy vocals nestled above. Less is most definitely more.

Women's Hour

Woman's Hour

If you put The Cocteau Twins, Sade and a twist of slower Goldfrapp into your indie-juicer you'd create a band not unlike Woman's Hour. Not a bad start. What do you mean you don't have a juicer? If you're going to create a band named after the spiritual home of the left leaning middle class you better hop off to John Lewis prompto. Woman's Hour originally began by naming all of their tracks after programmes on Radio 4's schedule, the track Jenni was named after Jenni Murray, presenter of Woman's Hour. I have a lot to thank Radio 4 for, keeping me sane and informed as I worked the late shift in a Bristol petrol station, although Woman's Hour was on in the mornings so I missed that. Ahhh the slow motion car crash that was the 1992 election ... I digress, but the name fits the sophisticated and intelligent sound perfectly. Super stuff.

Nordic Giants

Nordic Giants

Following in the DSF tradition of afterhours audio-visual treats we are quite beside ourselves to introduce Nordic Giants. We insist that you download Spotify and listen to everything they have ever released. Their output, in places reminds us of AIM's 'Cold Water Music' which we suggest you listen to as well while you're at it. Quite captivating. However that is only half of the story as the band's live show sees them accompany various independent, breathtaking short films which are intrinsically brilliant. And add to this a certain anonymity due to the band being covered head to toe in elaborate feathered garb and you've an experience not to be missed. More of an artwork than a band, you will see nothing like it all weekend. Note to parents with under 12s - this show is staged after 11pm due to the unsettling nature of a couple of the shorts.

Eliza And The Bear

Eliza And The Bear

First thing to note here is that there is no Eliza in Eliza And The Bear. Cunning. Nor are there any bears for that matter. Boo, we'll gloss over that disappointment by stating that Eliza And The Bear are five very enthusiastic young fellows from London in the seemingly constant pursuit of conveying their pure excitement at being alive. Good for them. To be young again and not having to worry how on earth you're going to find out where the leak in the shower is coming from. If the euphoric folk pop glove fits, wear it, and they wear it well. It might even stop them from getting 'cold in the night' on their trip up is entertain us in July. See what we did there. With the reputation to win an entire festival crowd over in record time Eliza And The Bear have supported some pretty big names at Wembley Arena no less, we hope they'll feel at home on our slightly more modest main stage :)

The Fauns

The Fauns

You wait five years for great shoegaze influenced bands and then they all come along at once, as the wheel of musical ascendancy slowly spins. Three years ago we were awash with banjos. Bristol, apart from being an ace place to live has a great scene going on at the moment (Velcro Hooks from DSF4 of course) and part of that scene are the fantastic The Fauns. They inhabit the sweet spot somewhere between My Bloody Valentine and School Of Seven Bells on the style-spectrometer. They make a glorious noise. The band are signed to Geoff Barrow's label Invada Records - a man who never forgave me for cleaning his AKAI S1000 sampler with bleach in my time as Portishead's studio tea-boy all those years ago.

Keston Cobblers Club

Keston Cobblers Club

In last year's site reshuffle we lost the Deer Shed stage, and many of you bemoaned it's passing which was shortsighted of you because it's a great place to put the skips. Only joking. For us it was just too near to the Main Stage and sound spillage was a problem. But this year we have a whole new stage near the Obelisk in which we'll host a variety of stuff over the weekend, a festival within a festival, complete with its own bar, coffee and caramel slices. This setting will be perfect for bands like the Keston Cobblers Club who will provide you with catchy contemporary folk music, jaunty would be the word. The quality of Keston Cobblers Club's output has earned them an enviable invitation from Steve Lamacq to play a session at Maida Vale studios as part of BBC introducing.

Sam Airey

Sam Airey

I think we can safely say that Sam is an old friend of the festival having played twice in Baldersby Park but also played for us when we used to put on gigs at the Old Courthouse in Thirsk (where In The Dock comes from.) During his year away from us he has wrapped a band around him which is something we're really looking forward to catching for the first time. It is always great to read your comments after the festival, especially those from folks that find our more intimate performances their favourite of the whole weekend. Sam has in the past had a large number of shouts for his evocative songs, husky voice and sweet guitar playing. Incidentally brother of Sam, Tom Airey, is one of Anthologies boys who beautifully capture some of our artists on video each year.

Beccy Owen

Beccy Owen

Beccy is an ever popular face at Deer Shed having played a couple of years ago and also run some very well received singing workshops. A huge name in her native Newcastle, responsible for creating legendary block busting queues at her gigs Beccy has by all accounts just come out of a pretty heavy abusive relationship and generally been down in the dumps. We are assured she is happy that we all know about this. Her album Imago released last year documents this period of her life but doesn't particularly sound like a negative record, it's surprisingly uplifting in places actually, and always has her hallmark theatrical sound and velvety voice. If you enjoy her performance (and of course you will) you should try to attend one of her singing workshops too where you'll learn a selection of accessible and uplifting material - suitable for all states of mind(!), ages, abilities and experience.

Police Dog Hogan

Police Dog Hogan

Yours truly used to be in a dads band who at our height got a late night Radio 1 play by mistake and some sincere (we think) encouragement from Rob Da Bank. That was about the height of our achievements before our aging backs we got fed up with lifting heavy amps. Enter Police Dog Hogan, another dads band with considerably more emphasis on fun than our quartet. We know they are dads because two of their seven number, Tim Dowling and Tim Jepson, are downtrodden Dads writing about life as columnists in The Guardian and The Telegraph respectively. I sympathise I really do. Lazily described as bluegrass, folky, banjo-plucking Americana and in places easily mistakable for Steve Earle, their sound is immediately identifiable as festival-crowd-pleasing, a phrase that deserves further dissection but we're out of space. Top fun on our new Obelisk Stage.

Paper Aeroplanes

Paper Aeroplanes

Names such as The Civil Wars, Laura Marling, Suzanne Vega and Fleetwood Mac are often mentioned when describing Paper Aeroplanes but most would agree that the band have a sound completely of their own. From the wild shores of West Wales, Sarah and Richard have been working together for 5 years, concocting intricate, heartfelt songs about the things that really matter in life. With burgeoning support across the UK and Europe, live is where Paper Aeroplanes really shine. Folk infused alternative pop songs are topped off with Sarah's truly beautiful, spine-tingling voice, which could break even the hardest of hearts. On February 11th Paper Aeroplanes release the Circus EP, a bundle of new tracks and remixes led by one of the most honest and powerful songs from their critically acclaimed 2013 album Letter Letters.

Broken Broadcast

The Broken Broadcast

Like being sat with a shotgun guarding a massive pile of post-apocalyptic potatos, running your own festival allows you to wield a certain power over the waves of musicians and bands who contact us every year hankering after a festival slot. You get Viagra spam, we get band spam. And Viagra spam. Anonymous requests are of course easy to deal with, there is a button on a keyboard especially designed for them. Pesterings from friends in bands are altogether harder to deal with. Actually Mark from The Broken Broadcast didn't pester us at all, we're getting carried away. But it's hard, like we said, unless the band are great, which The Broken Broadcast are. Whoever produced We're Just Waiting For Our Friends ,featured here, knows their onions. Very Kloot vs Garvey IMHO.

Happyness

Happyness

Happyness are a three-piece from South London consisting of Jonny Allan, Benji Compston and Ashley Cooper. Having self-produced their debut EP in Jelly Boy Studios, their loft, the band will be announcing their self-titled EP set for release early January 2014. In the lead up to this lo-fi 4-track offering, mixed by Ed Harcourt and mastered by Adam Lasus (Yo La Tengo, Daniel Johnston, Clap Your Hands Say Yeah), Happyness have gathered friends and fans on both sides of the Atlantic. Influences are diverse and broad but bands such as Sparklehorse, Yo La Tengo and Wilco have clearly inspired. Dreamy, hook laden, with a song writing prowess far beyond their tender years – Happyness are the real deal.

The Buffalo Skinners

The Buffalo Skinners

If there's anything a good busking band can do it's entertain the masses. The Buffalo Skinners started life as a busking band in 2010, channelling old folk and skiffle heroes to appreciative ears in northern coastal towns. Four years together now finds them leaning towards a fuller electric sound borrowing from 60's rock & roll, British invasion bands and still, from their first love, folk. Their live show comes equipped with infectious energy and an arsenal of instruments; Fender Rhodes keyboard, violin and accordion, topped off with their signature 'harmonious vocal cacophony.' All designed to directly cause a good time. "Jolly exciting!" says Cerys Matthews, BBC 6 Music.

The Glendale Family

The Glendale Family

Some things are part of the furniture at Deer Shed Festival. The staff, contractors and many of our audience seem to happily return to Baldersby Park every year, and apart from last year when they had a year off, so do The Glendale Family. If we were to have a house band they would be it. Over the weekend they seem to pop up everywhere, not just their allotted stage time. You'll find them in the campsite and the after-hours bar too. The Glendale Family formed in 2010 and are a five-piece headed by song writing couple Chris and Blaise Ingram and their music can be aptly described as bluesy, upbeat folk pop. We'd say don't miss them, but you won't.

Lowpines

Lowpines

Lowpines are a cool duo from west London, although their original habitat is much further north. Behind the sombre-sounding name are Oli Deakin and Lyla Foy, partners in the subline. The talented duo have released two EPs – 'Give Me A Horse' in 2012, and 'Avenue Blues' in 2013 – and have an album finished which will see the light of day this summer 2014. You may think that progress has been slow, but when you take into account the amount of time spent also on Lyla Foy's own work (on which Oli also plays), then the bigger picture is one of two people pushing hard to create twin masterpieces.

Billie Marten

Billie Marten

Billie Marten first picked up a guitar in her North Yorkshire home at the age of 8. Not too long after that, she started writing her own words and music - and she hasn't stopped since. She says she can't pin down a single source of inspiration, but her live set sees her original compositions sandwiched between everyone from Laura Marling and Lucy Rose to Joni Mitchell and Daughter. There's even been an occasional outbreak of Nirvana. Her intense, mature vocals and confident guitar technique are a joy simply to listen to, but there's no denying that there's extra layer of fascination when she plays live - because it's only when they can see her that people realise she's 14. Luckily for them, she's not just good for 14. She's good full stop.